Sunday, October 25, 2015



Netiquette for Social Media

Social media has truly become an important modern-day communications tool. People from all over the world have in varying degrees embraced this new technology, and find it to be user-friendly, cost-efficient and expansive in reach. However, while there are many positive and perhaps ‘freeing’ opportunities of sharing information there is a need to understand some of the social etiquette's or better known ‘netiquettes’ of this field.

Is it important to be polite, professional and have some sort of ‘good manners’ when using social media platforms? Absolutely. Sometimes we forget that this is just another form of communication that is not only quick and easy, but unfortunately undeletable. As the field further evolves, it isn’t the ‘wild west’ or as open and ungoverned as it used to be.

Current and future professionals should be careful what they post on their public and private pages. According to theroundupnews.com, “43 percent of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates.” That’s a huge number that seems to only be growing.

Some good advice offered by theroundupnews.com:

-          Think before you share
-          Be appropriate
-          Know who follows you or sends you a friend request

We should learn to be people who “deliver class on a platter,” (Price 2015). Just because someone is behind a computer monitor doesn’t take away from the fact, that the other person reading the message won’t actually ‘feel’ something as a result of rude or troll behavior.

Here are some do’s and don’ts for the use of social media:

-          Don’t print messages in all caps
-          Do remember your good manners; the age old adage, ‘if you don’t have anything good to say, then don’t say it at all.’
-          Do be polite and ask someone for permission before you tag them
-          Don’t be afraid to untag yourself
-          Don’t feel obligated to accept every friend request

Good advice: Before accepting someone’s friend request, you should ask, do you know this person, would you like to know this person and does that person have any reason to know anything about your life. (Arcolace 2014)

  
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